She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity.

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  • Author(s): Schneiderman, Cate
  • Source:
    Library Journal; 4/1/2018, Vol. 143 Issue 6, p91-91, 1/6p
  • Document Type:
    Book Review
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      SCHNEIDERMAN, C. She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity. Library Journal, [s. l.], v. 143, n. 6, p. 91, 2018. Disponível em: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eue&AN=128688321. Acesso em: 4 jun. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Schneiderman C. She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity. Library Journal. 2018;143(6):91. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eue&AN=128688321. Accessed June 4, 2020.
    • APA:
      Schneiderman, C. (2018). She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity. Library Journal, 143(6), 91.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Schneiderman, Cate. 2018. “She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity.” Library Journal 143 (6): 91. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eue&AN=128688321.
    • Harvard:
      Schneiderman, C. (2018) ‘She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity’, Library Journal, 143(6), p. 91. Available at: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eue&AN=128688321 (Accessed: 4 June 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Schneiderman, C 2018, ‘She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity’, Library Journal, vol. 143, no. 6, p. 91, viewed 4 June 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Schneiderman, Cate. “She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity.” Library Journal, vol. 143, no. 6, Apr. 2018, p. 91. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eue&AN=128688321.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Schneiderman, Cate. “She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity.” Library Journal 143, no. 6 (April 2018): 91. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eue&AN=128688321.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Schneiderman C. She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity. Library Journal [Internet]. 2018 Apr [cited 2020 Jun 4];143(6):91. Available from: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=eue&AN=128688321

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2018 April #2

*Starred Review* When Gregor Mendel died, in 1884, his funeral drew thousands of grieving peasants—but not a single scientist. Zimmer here illuminates the Augustinian friar's once-unrecognized scientific breakthrough as a pivotal turning point in a human investigation of heredity, which has replaced Aristotle's speculative conjectures on the topic with the empirical knowledge compiled in the twenty-first-century chromosomal map of the human genome. That map and potent new microtechnologies for manipulating the biochemistry of the mapped genes have opened astonishing possibilities both for probing the distant past of human origins and for creating a brave new future of human development, free from genetic disease and weakness. But alongside this trajectory of stunning progress, readers trace a history of misconceptions about heredity. Some of those misconceptions—such as Darwin's mistaken pangenesis theory of all body cells influencing heredity—have arguably benefited science by stimulating debate and better research. Others, such as those motivating Nazi eugenicists, have augured only brutal racism. As revolutionary science now opens the prospect of designer superbabies—tantalizing some, horrifying others—Zimmer challenges the widespread misconception that DNA alone determines human identity, adducing compelling evidence that the way genes express themselves depends on environment, nutrition, and even culture. A wide-ranging and eye-opening inquiry into the way heredity shapes our species. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2018 April #1

Zimmer (creative writing, Yale Univ.; Soul Made Flesh) has years of experience as a science journalist, and with this book strives to combine his varied research about heredity into one place. Heredity is really the only term to describe the material because Zimmer discusses much more than genes, including the "father of modern genetics" Gregor Mendel and the latest research on microbiomes, along with more controversial topics such as eugenics and genetic engineering. Particularly interesting is the discussion of epigenetics, a system reminiscent of Lamarkism that affects gene expression without altering the DNA itself. Jean-Baptiste Lamarck was a contemporary of Charles Darwin who believed individuals could pass down adaptations acquired during their lifetimes to their descendants. Zimmer makes the science personal by exploring his own family genealogy, DNA, and microbiome. The only drawback of this book, besides its length, is the vagueness of the chapter headings, which reveal little about what each section will hold. VERDICT Overall, Zimmer's latest offers a comprehensive look at all aspects of heredity in readable and accessible text for anyone interested in the topic.—Cate Schneiderman, Emerson Coll., Boston

Copyright 2018 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2018 February #3

In a magnificent work exploring virtually all aspects of heredity, journalist Zimmer (Parasite Rex), masterfully blends exciting storytelling with first-rate science reporting. Although he lucidly explains the basics of Mendelian genetics—which address inheritance and biological diversity—he goes far beyond that topic to explore the complexities of genetic inheritance. For example he notes that there are at least 800 genes influencing height in humans, but collectively they explain only about one-quarter of the heritability of that trait. Zimmer is not shy about taking on controversial topics like the genetics of race, arguing that there aren't genetic fingerprints for race ("Ancient DNA doesn't simply debunk the notion of white purity. It debunks the very name white"), and making the case that it is currently all but impossible to draw significant conclusions about the roles genes play in overall intelligence. He also probes developing field of epigenetics (changes in gene expression rather than alteration of genetic code) as well as the role of genetics in developmental and cancer biologies. Zimmer's writing is rich, whether he's describing the history of the field or examining the latest research and ethical issues certain to arise. His book is as engrossing as it is enlightening. Agent: Eric Simonoff, WME. (June)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.